Adoption and Prayer
By Ginny Luedeman

Under the Black-and-white sketch of a smiling young girl was the caption, “I’m Looking for a Home.” The newspaper article that followed described a precocious nine-year-old of mixed race, who loved animals and was hoping her new family had lots of them.
I’m sure that story melted the heart of everyone who read it. It melted mine. I responded by opening up in prayer to this beautiful child in need. I just wrapped her up in my prayer:


Father/Mother God, I know that this child belongs to You. You fill all space, and Your love includes everyone in it. Home, with all of its tenderness and security, is a gift given to each and every child in Your care. All are in Your all-powerful love, right now. The fear and ignorance that come from a limited, material view of You can in no way diminish the love You have for all of Your creation. The Lord’s Prayer states our relationship to You. It begins, “Our Father....” Therefore, this child is loved and has a home, right now.


I prayed along these lines until peace completely filled my heart.


After praying, I felt impelled to call and ask about that little girl. Within a month, she was in our home. (And we already had animals-dogs, cats, birds, and fish-to welcome her, too.)


A year later, the psychiatrist who had treated her until the adoption was final called us about a second child, Kate, who needed a home. This physician knew that we had prayed about the challenges we were facing with raising a special needs child. He had seen the power of prayer bring our daughter freedom from hyperactivity, stress-related illness, anger, and emotional instability. This progress made him feel that we were the right parents for six-year-old Kate.


Kate had severe emotional challenges. It was clear that helping her would require of us deep tenderness and patience. We had opportunity after opportunity to see how powerful prayer is. Many of the problems Kate suffered from when she first came to us dissolved within a year- allergies, cross-eye, telling lies, a fear of women, inability to learn, excessive talking.


Our prayers brought to light Kate’s innate purity, and we saw more clearly her spiritual perfection-we saw her more as God knows her. This freed her from crippling limitations. It lifted her above psychological labels, which God never pins on anyone. Prayer shone a light on Kate’s right to wake up to her identity as God’s child. (You can read Kate Luedeman Bailey’s first-person account in this issue’s “News of healing.”)


Both of our adopted daughters were in the care of the state for much of their young lives. Foster care attempts to provide loving homes for children who need stability until more permanent homes can be found. The reasons that children are placed in foster card vary as much as do the children themselves. The system strives to provide for kids in need, but the care is only as good as the care providers, and many more good ones are required.
Children without parents face a variety of unique challenges. Easy solutions are almost nonexistent. Adoptive parents also face challenges when they accept a new child into their home. But with prayer, patience, and lots of love, healing can, and does, take place. The pain and fear that many foster children face in their young lives can be pre-empted by a settled and natural relationship born of the fact that we all truly are the children of our one parent, our loving Father/Mother God.


Now, more than two decades later, our lives are blessed with hugs from grandchildren we would never have had if we hadn’t adopted those girls.


“Copyright©2004 The Christian Science Publishing Society, All rights reserved, Reproduced with permission”.


SAME SENTINEL (Testimonial)
By Kate Luedeman Bailey

When I was two, my homeless birth mother abandoned me. She left me with the telephone operator at t hotel where we had stayed for a night or two. The state took custody of me and put me in an orphanage. My mother was later found, but she was unable to care for me, so she relinquished parental custody. It was therefore up to the state to find me a home.


By the time I was six, I had lived in at least 12 foster and prospective adoptive homes. Because of the numerous moves, the abuse, and the fact that I had never bonded with parents, I was diagnosed as a “hard-to-place” child with severe emotional disorders and learning disabilities.
A psychiatrist whose care I was under knew a Christian Science family, the Luedemans, who had successfully adopted a girl with similar problems. He called them and recommended me to their family. They set up and appointment to meet me.


I deeply yearned to be able to stay in the same place with a mom and dad and sisters and brothers. I didn’t want to carry my little brown bag with my belongings in it into yet another home. I remember lying in bed and praying that God would find me a mom and dad and that I would be safe and have a home of my own.


My religious training up to that time had been sporadic. I recall being taught that I was bad and a sinner. But I couldn’t believe this teaching, and I held on to the thoughts that there was a God who loved me and that I was good. When I heard that the family that was considering me went to church, this made me happy.


Within a month after the Luedemans and I first met, I was placed in their home. Within a year, most of those labels that had been placed on me no longer had any relation to who I was. I was quickly becoming a happy and normal child. My ability to learn was soon up to grade level. The psychiatrist who had recommended me to the Luedemans was amazed at the changes in my behavior. When I was adopted, my treatment with him was discontinued.
I am now a happily married mother of two. Over the 22 years since I found my home, I’ve had many healings that have come through prayer, including torn ligaments in my knees from having been hit by a car. I’ve also been healed of being excessively afraid.
God made all these things possible.


Copyright©2004 The Christian Science Publishing Society, All rights reserved, Reproduced with permission”.

 Ginny Luedeman

 

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